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WATCH: Exclusive Interview with Former Deputy Chief of Detroit Police Gary Brown

Former Deputy Chief of Detroit Police Gary Brown addresses students at WSU

Gary Brown speech: Part Two

Gary Brown speech: Part Three

Gary Brown speech: Part Four

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Friday, 20 February, 2009 9:28 PM

Former Deputy Chief of Detroit Police Gary Brown addresses criminal justice students at WSU

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

Gary Brown spoke to students and guests at the Law School Auditorium at WSU on February 18, 2009.

by Garrett Godwin
ggodwin82@yahoo.com

 

Former Deputy Chief of Detroit Police Gary Brown addresses students at WSU

Gary Brown speech: Part Two

Gary Brown speech: Part Three

Gary Brown speech: Part Four

DETROIT -- The word justice can be defined is harmony and fairness as well as having an impartial system, and it is the same system that Gary Brown still believes in after everything that has happened in the case of disgraced former Kwame Kilpatrick. Brown, a former Deputy Chief of the Detroit Police Department, spoke with Criminal Justice students inside the Law School Auditorium at Wayne State University Wednesday afternoon on the integrity in the criminal justice system. "Having integrity starts at home," he stated. "Parents watch what you do. None of us is perfect; we all make mistakes. If we continue to make the same mistakes, we don't want to be associated with that person."

Brown was unjustly terminated from his job in May 2003 due to the Kilpatrick whistleblower case, in which Kwame lied under oath about having an affair with former Chief of Staff Christine Beatty; the text messages between them was released last year by the Detroit Free Press, which led Kwame to his resignation and sentenced to prison for 120 days (he was recently released after serving 99 and is now hired for an position for Compuware in Texas, but the case is pending on whether he's allowed to move out of Michigan with his family to take the job).

"If there's one thing I learned [from all of this]," the 54-year-old said, "it is that values, character, and integrity are worth fighting for. If Kwame cooperated, then the behaviors of the police officers would've been handled differently. Police are to protect and serve, but who guards the guardians? Even in desperate economic times, communities needs guardians. The Mayor needs to stay away from the police department; let the Chief run the department. If you don't like the way things are going, then fire the Chief and hire a new one."

Taking the road less travel with a desire to help others, Brown's 26-year career in law enforcement includes undercover work in narcotics and director of Internal Affairs. He spoke about a narcotics case, in which the defendant were granted two bonds despite the fact that he shot Brown -- but in the end, justice was served and the jury vindicated Brown.

"I came out on the winning side," he responded, "with the determination to make the world, the community, and the city safe. When we see the strong abusing the weak, we're the ones who feel compelled to get involved. If you grow up following the right path, you won't need directions. Your values are you." However, he and two other officers have spent the last five years not only fighting for justice, but also for personal redemption. "There comes a time when silence is betrayed," Brown quoted Dr. King from his 1967 speech in New York about his opinion on the Vietnam War.

Brown sensed a kindred spirit with the criminal justice students during his speech, as he spoke on the importance of having a college degree. Graduated from high school in 1971, he never thought about college until then-Mayor Dennis Archer put a degree as having an requirement for the job of Inspector. By the time he graduated from Wayne State in 1992, Brown was already married with children. "Few of the college students choose police work," he continued. "Whatever you decide, I hope you realize that a college degree is valuable -- that being on the police department isn't a job but a purpose."

Still idealistic and dedicated to the twin pillars of law and justice, Brown is now running for a position on the City Council later this year: proving that he's known more than the man who stood up for his family, reputation, and integrity through the Kwame Kilpatrick scandal.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

Gary Brown speaks to individuals from Wayne State.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

Former Deputy Chief of Detroit Police Gary Brown is introduced.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

Gary Brown accepts the Collegian Award from the WSU College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

Gary Brown said: "Law enforcement is not a job but an honorable profession."

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

If you make a mistake, "admit it quickly, resolve it and be personally accountable," said Brown.

 

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