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WATCH: Highlights of "Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius" at the Detroit Science Center

Quicktime Video

 

Win Tickets to see "Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius"

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Local News / Entertainment

Friday, 5 December, 2008 0:27 AM

Leonardo da Vinci exhibit continues thru Jan. 4 at the Detroit Science Center

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

These are just some of the inventions being shown at "Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius".

by Jason Rzucidlo
americajr@americajr.com

 

WATCH: Highlights of "Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius" at the Detroit Science Center

Quicktime Video

DETROIT -- The new exhibit "Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius" will be on display until Jan. 4, 2009 at the Detroit Science Center. It originally opened on Oct. 4, 2008. Many people know da Vinci for the Mona Lisa painting but he also was an inventor. A total of 60 of his inventions are on display including machines, designs and of course his paintings. Museum visitors can push, pull, crank and interact with them.

"Leonardo was a tinkerer, a constant engineer," said Rick Russell, Engneering Content Developer at the Detroit Science Center. "He was called the renaissance man. Aside from art, he was very, very good at anatomical studies as well as making inventions. He sketched over 13,000 pages of manuscripts so that he could observe the world around him."

Leonardo da Vinci was a multi-talented individual. Some of his designs became produced while others were considered unpractical. Some of his famous inventions are flying machines, robots, submarines, underweater breathing machines and most of the groundwork for the artificial heart valve. He also created the hang glider, helicopter, military tank and many others.

"This exhibit brings Leonardo's models to life," Russell said. "Models that have been built by the sketches so that people can interact with them in ways to experience the wonder of his genius."

The museum is hosting two more "Renaissance Days" in which visitors can dress in a Renaissance costume and save $2 off the price of admission. On Dec. 13 and 17, museum goers can create a masterpiece with da Vinci, take a shot at the Catapult Competiotn to win a prize, hands-on activities and demonstrations.

Additional items included in the exhibit are the hydraulic saw, screw of Archimedes, the fly wheel, an automobile device, a catapult, an excavating machine, the air screw, a paddle vessel, a mobile bridge, pulleys, ball bearings with three spheres, the escalator, the gear shift, a hydraulic drill, and a machine to lift heavy objects. There are many more on display for you to enjoy.

"He had a good grasp of mechanical concepts, physics principles, the way things work and now we've adapted some of those designs into our working devices today," said Russell. "We also have a very interesting area on flight."

Tickets to Leonardo da Vinci: Man, Inventor, Genius are $16.95 for adults and $13.95 for children and seniors. General museum admission is included. Discount tickets are available for groups and Detroit Science Center members. For more information, visit www.detroitsciencecenter.org or call 313.577.8400. The Detroit Science Center is located at 5020 John R. Street in Detroit, 48202.

 


PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / ©AMERICAJR.com

The exhibit features a large timeline at the beginning with important dates in Leonardo da Vinci's life.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / AMERICAJR.com

A replica of the Mona Lisa painting by Leonardo da Vinci is included in the exhibit.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / AMERICAJR.com

Museum goers can get their photo taken behind this large picture frame.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / AMERICAJR.com

A former map of the city of Detroit.

 

PHOTO BY JASON RZUCIDLO / AMERICAJR.com

Robot c.1495. Atlanticus, f. 216 v-b (579r). milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana.

 

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Unauthorized duplication or use of Text, Site Template, Graphics and or Site Design is Prohibited by Federal and International laws. See our Notice/Disclaimer and Privacy Policy.

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